You might find, when speaking with millionaires — especially self-made millionaires — that there is an element of optimism and joie de vivre. Many millionaires know that if things go wrong, it is possible to find the bright side, learn from mistakes, and move on. Additionally, many millionaires know how to enjoy life as well. Many successful and happy millionaires understand that there is more to life than just amassing wealth; sometimes you need to spend time with your family and friends, eat good food and relax a little. However, the ability to find a silver lining, and to have the persistence to try again, is one of the defining traits of a millionaire.
I have a question. I am 24 and I just started selling commercial insurance. My wife and I have about 70 k in student loans which we plan on paying back asap. I am going to have an additional 10k on top of my salary next year which I plan on saving until the end of the year and allocating it as I see fit. Everything I read says “compounding interest is the bomb” but then says “don’t save, pay down debt”. Now, I hate debt but I want to take full advantage of our young age and compounding interest. What would you recommend I do with extra 10k if we already put and extra $200 towards debt a month and we have an emegency fund in place? Fully Fund our IRA’s for the year or pay down a loan? I feel like there is no right or wrong answer. Your thoughts?

Freelance writing has completely changed our lives. For years, we worked great jobs in a funeral home. However, those jobs also demanded tons of time and exceptional amounts of emotional energy. We found ourselves working nights, weekends, and holidays – getting called out at all hours of the night and missing countless family events. These were good jobs, but they grew tiring.
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I have cleaned house, done dog sitting and sold items I no longer need. I have complimented my retirement income by about $ 1000 a year paying for a plane ticket, rental car, bed and breakfast, food and attraction tickets for a 3 to 4 day trip. It gives me something to really look forward to. I always pay taxes on the service income I make. Always give value.
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