I am a little late posting this, busy due to the holiday season. I love finding ways to make extra money. I have been using ebay for about a year, and sometimes make as much as I do at my job. My regular job is doing things for people that they cannot or don’t want to do for themselves. I am a personal assistant, house sit for people who own beach houses, clean out and organize closets and entire houses. The bonus to organizing closets is that they don’t want what they clean out, so I can sell it on ebay too 🙂
That being said, life in your 20s and 30s is not without its challenges; you might have student debt, a tenuous career, and dozens of unknowns that keep you from doing everything you'd like to build your wealth faster. There's no straightforward way to guarantee yourself a rich future, but these seven strategies can help you do it while you're still young.
A credit repairer with the email address (creditbrainiac.repair (AT g*m*a*i*l DOT) com) did a wonderful job on my credit report, never would’ve thought that they could do so much in such a short time period.I must admit that I was skeptical at first because I was told that most credit repair services were only a scam and that no one could repair my credit. However, now I am a firm believer and i am proud to say to anyone that because of credit brainiac’s professional credit repair service, I was able to purchase my first home. There was no way I had the time or knowledge to repair my credit myself. Credit brainiac did exactly what they said they would do and I’ve been able to receive prime interest rates on money i borrow.
25. Products – You can create your own product, such as an ebook or computer software. You would then use your blog as a promotion tool to get people to buy your product. As long as you create a legitimate product with a whole lot of value, you should be able to get some buyers, but like everything else with a blog, you’ll need the traffic to get the sells.
The prep work before you open up shop is more time-consuming. You need merchandise to sell, photos and descriptions to post, a name for your shop and a business plan to help you succeed. Once that’s done, you’ll still need to find customers. Depending on what you’re selling, that could take weeks, which is why you should expect the overall time for this gig to be slow.
If you have experience with marketing, SEO, or a knack for getting people excited about the products and services you use on a regular basis, think about refining your skills and putting them to work making money online as a small business marketing consultant in your region—especially if you can become a local SEO expert and can help local clients rank higher in their search results.
Now next, you’ll want to pick a WordPress theme from somewhere like ThemeForest, Elegant Themes or OptimizePress. This is the barebones design of your site, which you can then customize with your own branding, copy, and images. That being said, you don’t want to cheap out. It costs less than $100 to buy a theme that will make your website look professional (and you can upgrade to a completely custom design once you get the business going).
5. Fiverr – Fiverr is a great place to make a few bucks or spend a few bucks if you need some of the services people offer. Basically, everything is $5. You either pay $5 or charge $5. They call them “gigs.” You can offer your services however you choose. If you sell art and you’re fine selling pieces for $5 each, that’s a gig. If you’re a graphic designer and you want to offer your services for $10/hour, simply offer a 30 minute gig. If they need two hours of graphic design, they pay you $20, or $10/hour by buying four gigs.
As a financial adviser, I occasionally find myself feeling envious of certain clients. Not because of their wealth — but because of their discipline. They were determined enough to do all the right things which enabled them to accumulate their wealth and, in many cases, retire early. Despite my expertise, I, like a lot of people, sometimes struggle not to do the wrong things that make being rich, let alone retiring at all, a pipe dream.
One should think about their skills, hobbies and basic daily habits as well. Do you like to cook? Be a personal cook or dinner parties. Baking? Make wedding cakes or cupcakes for weddings/special events. Do you enjoy cleaning? Trying going to banks/repo companies and ask if they are in need of a repo cleaner or market yourself as a all-around cleaner. Know how to mow a lawn? Get paid to do it in your neighborhood. Sell products from large companies – Jewelry in a candle, Sentsy, Health and home products – etc.
The principles that I have followed out of grad school seems to have correspond to the article. At my age as part of the mid-end of the gen X, it seems that reaching the status of millionaire doesn’t reduce the anxiety of how to provide for the family. I still worry about the same things as before, but at perhaps at a different level. I admit getting to the first million was relatively easy with luck and good planning, but I thought I would have been much better off by now. It is also very tough to maintain with a bad economy. Forget about buying the Lamborghini or the large estate, it’s time to hold what you have.

What’s more, it’s time to get those list-making muscles in working order. Without face-to-face communication, it’s easy to let things slip through the cracks, so you’ll need to find ways to be as organized as possible. You might find that you like to write things down in a notebook, or perhaps you prefer calendar notifications. Find what works best for you to keep you organized and on task.


Another important personality trait to being successful and rich is patience. Nothing big is accomplished overnight, and you cannot and will not get rich in a matter of days. All the efforts you put towards accumulating wealth could take months or even years to pay off. It’s easy to get frustrated early on, especially when it seems like there’s a new wealthy person in the news every other day. However, realizing that your pace of success does not have to compete with theirs is crucial.
Holly fell into freelance writing on a whim. She submitted several pitches for guest posts and ended up landing a few clients. After roughly 6 months of freelancing on the side, she was making enough money to replace her income and work at home full-time. Now, she makes over $200,000 a year from writing alone. Not bad for a home-based business, eh?

Holly told me she started writing content in 2011. At the time, she still worked a full-time job but created content online part-time to supplement her income. Over time, she was able to double and triple her rates until she could quit her full-time job to write. These days, she makes bank as a freelance writer and teaches others to do the same via her online course, Earn More Writing.


One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. This is ever present in the sneaker world. I am an avid sneaker collector and a huge part of the culture is buying and selling your sneakers to keep updating your stock with your current favorites. I use a website called Kixify to buy and sell some of my sneakers and it is just like Ebay or Craigslist. Whenever I need money for whatever reason, I always look to see if I have a pair of shoes I am no longer in love with and willing to sell.
Protect yourself: In the end, you also need to protect yourself and your wealth, from yourself (doing something stupid with your savings) and others. Insurance, legal corporations, rainy day savings funds, tax shields and so on, there are many ways how you can protect yourself and your wealth. If you’re asking from what? From accidents, the government, market melts, sneaky salesmen and even from yourself is the answer.
Not quite ready to start your own blog, but still like the idea of getting paid to write? You may want to consider trying your hand at freelance writing. Many bloggers and website owners are willing to shell out some serious cash for high quality writers. In fact, Holly Johnson from ClubThrifty.com makes over $200,000 per year from freelance work! And she has a course that teaches others how to do the same.
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