First and foremost, you have to set realistic goals. You have to constantly track and check in with your finances. Otherwise, how will you know when you’ve finally made it rich? Give yourself quarterly figures to hit. Keep track of all streams of income and make sure you know where all of this money is going. But don’t track it by month — things fluctuate too much and month to month figures don’t matter as much as year-to-year figures. This will give you a better idea of where you’ll be in the long run. You’re in it for the long haul, remember? 
That might be why we have on-demand everything. We live in a society where fast food is prevalent and exists on nearly every corner or town across the United States and we're able to access all of the world's information in real time from anywhere we want from little pocket super computers. We can hail rides, find dates and do everything in a flash, instantaneously. Clearly, we want to lose weight and get right quickly and not have to wait, purely because our ids are so powerful.

To help you weed through all the sites out there, we’ve actually written an article all about survey sites to teach you the ins and outs and give you several sites to get started with.  We’ve actually vetted these sites and know that they’re the good ones.  So if that’s something that interests you, I encourage you to read this article and get started making some extra cash today with no startup cost.
Holly fell into freelance writing on a whim. She submitted several pitches for guest posts and ended up landing a few clients. After roughly 6 months of freelancing on the side, she was making enough money to replace her income and work at home full-time. Now, she makes over $200,000 a year from writing alone. Not bad for a home-based business, eh?
One of the best places to sell unwanted personal possessions is Decluttr, a website that buys used items directly from consumers. Unlike trade-in marketplaces such as Gazelle and auction websites such as eBay, Decluttr doesn’t act as a middleman between buyers and sellers. Rather, it’s best understood as a bulk buyer: an enterprise with deep pockets and an unsatiable appetite for used consumer products.
Great message, Jeff. When I look at big goals, or even incremental goals, I like to break them down into bite size bits. Earning $100,000 a year seems difficult in many situations, but it seems easier when you break it down to $8,350 a month, or roughly $280 a day. Sure, that is aggressive for many salaries, but there are many ways to fill the gaps with side income, owning a small business, consulting, freelance work, etc. The same concept works for any number or goal you want to reach. Find out where you are, and what it will take to reach the next step. It’s much more attainable when you make incremental goals.

Hi Patrick, thanks for the comment. You can start by looking in to some opportunities listed on this post. Then, you may want to set up a professional website for yourself to market your services. If you have experience in a particular field, you can start yourself to potential clients. If you don’t have any experience, you may want to do a few jobs for free to build up enough experience to improve your chances of getting hired. Good luck!
There are lots of ways of becoming or being rich which he outlines in the book, but the most powerful points he feels are: to clear your mind, set your feet firmly with determinism to get rich, laugh at your fears that only hold you back and then simply ACT -- you have to act! Oh, there's more to it than that of course, but you'll have to read for yourself.
Marketing. When operating as a consultant, you won’t necessarily be marketing your company; you’ll be marketing yourself. You’ll have to “package” yourself in a way that makes people trust you. For instance, if you’re marketing yourself as a financial consultant, ask yourself why someone would trust you with their life savings, and then figure out a way to convey that to potential clients. It might be in the form of a brochure, a portfolio, a sales letter, or all three.
I first learned about you when I downloaded your free e-book, How to Make Money – BLOGGING, via Amazon Kindle. It was a sure one-sitting kind of book but is very meaty. I got all the wonderful ideas from your book and finally decided to visit your website to harvest some more inspiration. I am so glad my path was directed here because I also have just started my incognito blog.

If you’ve received gifts you really don’t want – and they’re still in the packages – try returning them. Some retailers will take them back up to a year later.   If you are not sure where the item was purchased, try going online and searching.  If a retailer like Walmart or Target pops up then you can return it there without a receipt and get a gift card.


Tim, I know several millionaires, and most of them have done it the old fashioned way, which is working and saving over many years. Some have started their own businesses, some have made wealth through other means such as investments and real estate, and some have done it other ways. Virtually all of the millionaires I know have families (some were married without children, but most had children). I’ve never counted how many millionaires I know, but of the people I know for certain, I would venture to say that I know at least 10-15 of them would qualify under these standards. As for the college education part of it, I’ve never taken a poll to find out how many had degrees and which degree they had, if they had one.


Start a bed and breakfast. If you live in a popular resort area or own a historic property, a B&B might be the perfect side hustle. Not only can you work at home with this career, but you’ll also score some tax write-offs in the process — although most innkeepers caution that the profession requires a lot of hard work and is more of an attractive lifestyle than a money-making pursuit.

We've all heard the saying. Pay yourself first. But how many people follow it? The truth is that most of the world lives with a scarcity mentality. They go paycheck to paycheck, petrified of what might occur if they get sick or lose their job or something else traumatic happens. The truth is that if you don't pay yourself first, you'll never be able to get rich. It's part of having an abundant mindset and should be prioritized at all costs.
I’m really torn here. As a writer, I sympathize with you. I’ve looked again and again into freelancing, and consistently find that the rates other people are willing to work for make it an insulting waste of my time. (Like, $10/hour is what a 15-year-old babysitter makes, not a professional writer.) On the other hand, you really can’t ask others to not compete with you. On the plus side, in my (limited) experience, you do get what you pay for most of the time. My sister had a less-expensive wedding photographer, and she was definitely less than happy with the results. So …
It sounds a bit like a cliche, doesn't it? Just add value, and everything will be better. But how many people do you really think go out there into the world with the desire to add massive amounts of value? Clearly, many people are out there to do the least amount of work for the greatest return. That mindset is born from the id. It's instinctive, and hidden within the far reaches of our subconscious mind. Overcoming that is a hurdle, but a very necessary one to make.
To understand these losses in extreme isolation, the easiest case to understand is Japan, because the loss of firearms in Japan was witnessed and described. It took place in a literate society. Guns arrived in Japan around 1543 with two Portuguese adventurers who stepped ashore, pulled out a gun, and shot a duck on the wings. A Japanese nobleman happened to be there, was very impressed, bought these two guns for $10,000, and had his sword-maker imitate them. Within a decade, Japan had more guns per capita than any other country in the world, and by the year 1600 Japan had the best guns of any country in the world. And then, over the course of the next century, Japan gradually abandoned guns.
In addition, I've been talking about conditions to maximize productivity and creativity and moneymaking ability. There are other considerations in organized human groups, and there are conditions under which productivity is not the thing you're most interested in. There are conditions where more centralization may be appropriate. For example, during a war, you do not want your air force, army, and navy to be fiercely competing with each other, but instead you want during a war more centralized control than you do in peace time. And there are also human groups for which productivity and differential money-making ability are not the overriding consideration. I don't want you to go home tonight and each of you to say to your spouse or significant other, "Darling, I've just heard this guy Jared Diamond, who says that within human groups competition is what spurs productivity and innovation, and so I think we need to follow his advice in our household. For the next month let's see which of us earns a bigger income, and at the end of the month the bigger income-producer will keep on with the job, and the one of us who has lower income and is less efficient can turn to scrubbing the floors and shopping at the supermarkets." That just illustrates: there are other considerations in a marriage than optimizing productivity.

However, what he didn't fully appreciate at the time was just how much others were helping in the process to push and enact those deals. When he walked away from a nearly $2-billion-in-sales company at the age of 30, he simply didn't realize that. In his own words, he was full of himself and entirely overconfident about what he could achieve on his own. His slow and steady decline in the 22 months that followed his departure from that business was one of the most brutal periods in his life, where he almost lost all hope.
At work, you had to keep your desk neat so that you looked organized—and sure, it’s always helpful to see the top of your desk. But at home, who cares if clutter collects around you? Well, don’t fall into that trap (especially video conference calls are part of your routine). While you might miss the building services team, who used to wipe down your crusty keyboard and empty your waste paper baskets every night, it’s ultimately up to you to keep your space spic and span so you can do your best work.
Thank you for the input. I think your probably right….the purse selling would be a huge challenge. Thank you for the suggestions 1 & 2. My husband owns a complete auto care business and we are leaning towards purchasing vehicles from individual sellers to resell. That may be the more certain route to take. We have access to auto technicians and auto equipment etc. I was kinda trying to do something myself, I’ll get back to brain storming!
Invest your time. For example, you might like having free time, so you give yourself a few hours a day to do nothing. But if you were to invest those few hours into getting rich, you could work towards having 20 years of free time (24 hours a day!) with early retirement. What can you give up now in exchange for being rich later? Investment advisor Dave Ramsey likes to tell his radio audience, "Live like no one else today so that you can live like no one else tomorrow."
I see we have the same mindset. I really believe I’ll be a millionaire in the future, and I’ve been working toward that for many years now. From time to time something can happen unexpected and cause you to have to spend a little more than you earn… you can’t make a habit of doing that though. This was a good article, and should help a lot of people if they will just do it.
The easy-to-use Ibotta app is the perfect way to squeeze some extra savings out of your grocery hauls. Before heading to the store, search for items on your shopping list within the app. Once you’ve checked out, snap a photo of your receipt and boom — cash back. When you sign up and claim your first 10 offers within 14 days, you’ll get a $20 bonus.

That being said, life in your 20s and 30s is not without its challenges; you might have student debt, a tenuous career, and dozens of unknowns that keep you from doing everything you'd like to build your wealth faster. There's no straightforward way to guarantee yourself a rich future, but these seven strategies can help you do it while you're still young.


Jeff have you ever considered adding something on price comparison sites for selling your used stuff? One of the fastest 100 bucks I have made so far was just from old textbooks and dvds on price comparison sites that give you the best offers. I know Bonavendi.com is a good but im sure there are others. Anyway would be interesting to see your take on the matter, the other ideas I found really creative though. Thanks for the read brother
Something many self-made wealthy people have in common is that they are valuable in specific ways. Even when millionaires and billionaires are taken out of the equation, many rich people — doctors, engineers, filmmakers — have gotten rich after adding value to themselves and then adding value to the world. For example, a rich neurosurgeon may be specially talented and skilled. This surgeon added value to the world after improving their own skills and quality of life.
#24 – Magoosh – If you are good at GMAT, GRE, TOEFL, SAT, and ACT, and tests, Magoosh is looking to hire online test prep experts to help students prepare for these papers. As a requirement, you must be an experienced BA or BS holder with high scores in GRE, SAT, GMAT. The standard pay for weekdays is $20 an hour and shoots up to $25 an hour over the weekends.
They are usually FAKE female names that they use like: Kelly Nelson, Patty Joyner, Katy Jenkins, Jessica Meyer, Kelly Richards, Michelle Harris, Sarah Hunter, Judy Wilson, Janet Rhodes, Heather Johnson,Amy Livingston and TONS of others. It’s all about tugging at your heart strings, usually with a picture of mother and child. They even use IP reading software to make you think that the FAKE person lives in your area.
They believe that you are so gullible that they even use the same website template and say pretty much the same thing, just with different names for the program. They are usually some kind of link posting GARBAGE that is a JOKE and a TOTAL waste of time and money, but what you REALLY better watch out for, is the tricky ways they WILL try to get you to spend THOUSANDS of dollars.
Now that Mr. Dennis has died, I'll add my review. He spends the first two-thirds of the book telling you why you probably do NOT really want to get rich. He's quite convincing, and he convinced me of what I already sensed: I don't care enough about the benefits of riches to pay the price to be wealthy. I already have all I need. But I read the rest of the book anyway, because he's an entertaining writer.
I signed up for the scam for “only” $5.69. I checked my online banking after reading this and found that they had charged me for the $5.69 as well as $87.73. I went straight to their site and left a scathing message for them advising them to credit it back to my account or I would be contacting the authorities. I guess I should also contact the bank and ask them to block them from taking money. Does anyone know if there’s a way for the bank to be able to stop them from taking my money but still allow them to credit it back? Not that I expect them to actually do it but if they do it would be nice to get that money back. I just lost my job and $87.73 may not sound like much but to me right now its everything.

These questions about group organization arise at many different levels and for many types of groups. They arise, of course, about the organization of entire governments or countries: what is the best way to govern a country? Remember the classic arguments about whether the best government is a benign dictatorship, or a federal system, or an anarchical free-for-all. The same questions also rise about the organization of different companies within the same industry. How can you account for the fact that Microsoft has been so successful recently, and that IBM, which was formerly successful, fell behind but then drastically changed its organization over the last four years and improved its success? How can we explain the different successes of what we call different industrial belts? When I was a boy growing up in Boston, Route 128, the industrial belt around Boston, led the industrial world in scientific creativity and imagination. But Route 128 has fallen behind, and now Silicon Valley is the center of innovation. And the relations of businesses to each other in Silicon Valley and Route 128 are very different, possibly resulting in those different outcomes.         
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