I have always subscribed to paying yourself first, keeping debt under control and living within my means. Fortunately my wife and I have always made pretty good money so it was fairly pain free to be successful. We were so fortunate to not have any breaks in our work history which is a huge factor. For those who need to dip into savings to cover a long period of work outage, it can be devastating. I’m now at retirement age, house is paid for, no debt, million++ in investments…. You don’t know good it feels to be able to sleep good at night knowing that you can deal with anything that comes up.
Many Etsy sellers list their items and rarely get any sales.  If that happens, it’s probably because you haven’t done a very good job getting the word out.  One of the easiest ways to do that is to simply make a few free samples of your items and mail them to bloggers who write about the type of thing you make.  They can keep the item for free if they’ll write about it in a blog post.  If you get a few blogs to mention you who have traffic, you could make tons of sales!
Watch other people’s kids along with your own. There’s a good chance your friends who work outside of their homes would be thrilled to have an experienced parent watch their children while they are at the office. It can be manageable if your friend in need has only one or two kids. Plus, the new playmates will help keep your children occupied for a few hours. Pay varies widely based on where you live and the ages and number of kids you'll be watching, but babysitters and nannies typically can make up to $10 an hour in small cities and much more – even double that hourly rate – in larger cities.
Note:  Nearly all of these programs require an upfront investment for purchasing your initial inventory. They’re not our first choice when it comes to work from home jobs for this reason alone. We don’t like seeing users getting stuck with thousands of dollars in inventory only to realize they’re trying to offload their LuLaRoe into already saturated markets.
Earn money, spend less than you earn, save, invest, repeat the process. Embrace the Millionaire Mindset. After that, it’s just a matter of time. Even if it takes years or decades, the process really is that simple. Of course, it may not seem as easy as I laid it out here, but it really is. Remember, this is not an overnight get rich quick scheme. It takes time, planning, and a little luck along the way.

By applying these seven secrets in full swing, you'll be able to start accumulating wealth no matter where you are in life. Yes, the first steps are hard--paying down your debt, establishing your credentials, building an investment portfolio, etc.--but if you do it early and do it right, you'll set yourself up for massive financial success later on. 

This is quite a suggestive list. I am 32, turning 33 in Oct, and have 15 years in the Child Care field at a preschool, but would someday like to start working from home. As far as skills outside of Child Care as far as client relations & such, my other skills are crafting/bead making, professional organizing, and can type about maybe 50-60 wpm. Also was thinking of being an elderly companion, running errands, etc. Therefore I am wondering what I can really do from home with all this. I was thinking of creating some cards on vistaprint and just freelance as a Mother’s or Family Helper for those who have a rough time getting things done around the home, & who just don’t have the time of day whether it’s kids, relationships, family, etc. Would that make enough money providing I get a decent amount of clients? I am from south Florida just near Fort Lauderdale, so I’m just not sure. I know I don’t want to do child care forever, just cause it can be stressful at times. What do ya think? 🙂
This is definitely a scam. If you just call the 512-229-0385 number you will quickly figure out it is a scam. Because if this was a professional business they wouldn’t answer the phone hello. First time I called all I heard was music in the background and they hung up so I called back she sounded a little more professional the second phone call. First she asked Which business I was calling about so I asked what do you have more than one she said yes we are promoting 2 right now. Then I asked when the business was created she said November 16th 2017 she would not give me the owner of the company’s name she did tell me it was based in United States but would not give me a state her name was Anna no last name that’s unprofessional. So I waited a little while and call back you would think if it’s a big Corporation you would get a different person on the phone, but no I got the same lady and she answered it hello. So I was quick to say if this is a professional business-like home income systems you wouldn’t answer the phone hello you would be more professional about it and she quickly hung up. Do not give them your money it is a scam trying to take money from the poor just looking for a job to take care of their children. If you call the number ask if you questions wait a while and call back you’ll quickly see that it is a scam. They’re just trying to sell a dream it is too good to be true.
What makes even more surprising is the variety of positions available remote through the company. In fact, a search of their website using the term “work-at-home” turned up more than 1,000 positions. They include jobs in everything from customer service to clinical care. Nursing is naturally a common position, and one that’s often available on a remote basis. They’re often needed for online or phone consulting, both to provide clinical information and to direct incoming callers to direct care services.

They are usually FAKE female names that they use like: Kelly Nelson, Patty Joyner, Katy Jenkins, Jessica Meyer, Kelly Richards, Michelle Harris, Sarah Hunter, Judy Wilson, Janet Rhodes, Heather Johnson,Amy Livingston and TONS of others. It’s all about tugging at your heart strings, usually with a picture of mother and child. They even use IP reading software to make you think that the FAKE person lives in your area.
Even though risk-taking is a generally rewarding strategy in your 20s and 30s, it's also a good idea to diversify your efforts. Don't build up just one skill set, or one set of professional connections. Don't rely on one type of investment, and don't gamble all your savings on one venture. Instead, try to set up multiple income streams, generate several backup plans for your goals and businesses, and hedge your bets by looking for new opportunities everywhere. This will protect you from catastrophic losses, and increase your chances of striking it big in one of your ventures.
Now that Mr. Dennis has died, I'll add my review. He spends the first two-thirds of the book telling you why you probably do NOT really want to get rich. He's quite convincing, and he convinced me of what I already sensed: I don't care enough about the benefits of riches to pay the price to be wealthy. I already have all I need. But I read the rest of the book anyway, because he's an entertaining writer.
You can find index funds through most banks (just make sure they charge less than 1% fees), or through online sites like Vanguard.com.  Pick an index fund or ETF with a long track record and set it up to automatically take $170 per month from your bank account.  Just let it sit and do not touch it for any reason!  You’re guaranteed to see the money fluctuate up and down but do not touch it!   If you just leave it alone for years and keep adding to it each month, you’re pretty likely to end up with substantial wealth.
It really is that easy, and I think a lot of people don’t realize that. It’s just a psychological barrier nowadays since many can’t imagine what having $1 million feels like. In reality, $1 million isn’t that much money anymore. That might sound ridiculous, but I know I’m going to need much more than $1 million to retire someday. I’m not sure what my millionaire story will be yet, but I’m certain it’s going to involve self-employment since and not a job.
Don’t teach for someone else’s company- create your OWN courses and promote them to your own audience (if you have a website or a blog). We use teachable.com to host our online courses. I create the course, put it on that site, and then students pay money to access the material. No need to apply to anything, but it does take a different kind of work!
Research. You need to know what others are selling before you decide what wares you will offer. Lots of people sell handmade items, but those who work hard to make their items unique in some way are the ones who truly stand out. After you’ve decided on a product, check out the other sellers on Etsy and find what they’re offering, and then figure out how you can do it differently.
Become a freelance writer or editor. If you have a passion for storytelling or a background in writing or editing, it’s possible to find freelance writing or editing work online. To search available job openings, check out sites like UpWork.com and Problogger.net. You can also check traditional job sites such as Indeed.com and enter “telecommute” or “anywhere” in the location field.
Breaking In. Many people find that once they’ve completed their training, getting their first job can be difficult because many companies require a minimum of two years experience. Many newbies start out by volunteering to get some history under their belt. It’s not impossible to land a job fresh out of school, but you’ll need diligence and persistence, and probably a little luck.
The job: If you’re looking for a flexible, independent way to earn money — and you love hanging out with dogs — Rover might be your perfect gig. The online network connects dog walkers and sitters to local dog owners through its 4.9-star-rated app, so you don’t have to staple flyers on every utility pole across town. You can choose to offer a variety of services, including dog walking, overnight boarding at your home or theirs, and daycare.

Reduce your utility bills. Electricity, gas, and other utilities can deeply impact your monthly budget if you let them. So don't. Be smart about ways to keep your home cool during the summer and warm during winter. You may even consider investing in or building solar panels to channel the sun's natural energy into electricity. Keep your utilities low, and watch the money you save start to mount.
Something many self-made wealthy people have in common is that they are valuable in specific ways. Even when millionaires and billionaires are taken out of the equation, many rich people — doctors, engineers, filmmakers — have gotten rich after adding value to themselves and then adding value to the world. For example, a rich neurosurgeon may be specially talented and skilled. This surgeon added value to the world after improving their own skills and quality of life.
This is quite a suggestive list. I am 32, turning 33 in Oct, and have 15 years in the Child Care field at a preschool, but would someday like to start working from home. As far as skills outside of Child Care as far as client relations & such, my other skills are crafting/bead making, professional organizing, and can type about maybe 50-60 wpm. Also was thinking of being an elderly companion, running errands, etc. Therefore I am wondering what I can really do from home with all this. I was thinking of creating some cards on vistaprint and just freelance as a Mother’s or Family Helper for those who have a rough time getting things done around the home, & who just don’t have the time of day whether it’s kids, relationships, family, etc. Would that make enough money providing I get a decent amount of clients? I am from south Florida just near Fort Lauderdale, so I’m just not sure. I know I don’t want to do child care forever, just cause it can be stressful at times. What do ya think? 🙂
So these stories of isolated societies illustrate two general principles about relations between human group size and innovation or creativity. First, in any society except a totally isolated society, most innovations come in from the outside, rather than being conceived within that society. And secondly, any society undergoes local fads. By fads I mean a custom that does not make economic sense. Societies either adopt practices that are not profitable or for whatever reasons abandon practices that are profitable. But usually those fads are reversed, as a result of the societies next door without the fads out-competing the society with the fad, or else as a result of the society with the fad, like those European princes who gave up the guns, realizing they're making a big mistake and reacquiring the fad. In short, competition between human societies that are in contact with each other is what drives the invention of new technology and the continued availability of technology. Only in an isolated society, where there's no competition and no source of reintroduction, can one of these fads result in the permanent loss of a valuable technology. So that's one of the two sets of lessons that I want to draw from history, about what happens in a really isolated society and group.         
Set up a roadside stand. Depending on where you live, you could profit handsomely by setting up a roadside stand. If you live near a resort area, for example, you could buy cases of bottled water, put them on ice, and sell them to passers by for twice what you paid. Selling fruit and produce you grow yourself is also a smart idea in highly-traveled areas.

The ego is the driver making the decisions. It decides between the devil (the id) and the angel (the super-ego) on either shoulder (yes, all those cartoons you've ever seen are partly true). We have voices in our mind, and it's up to the ego to decide which one to fulfill. Its goal is to satisfy the id in some way while also attending to the super-ego.
“Remote work requires you to be a problem solver and a great communicator,” says Wade Foster, CEO and co-founder of Zapier, a 100-percent remote internet company. “In a remote environment, you have no one looking over your shoulder to help show you the next steps. That means you need to default to action and identify the opportunities where you can help your team and go find ways to solve those problems.”
Essentially the same thing happened in China with clocks: one emperor's decision abolished clocks over China. China was also on the verge of building powerful water-powered machinery before the Industrial Revolution in Britain, but the emperor said "Stop," and so that was the end of the water-powered machinery in China. In contrast, in Europe there were princes who said no to electric lighting, or to printing, or to guns. And, yes, in certain principalities for a while printing was suppressed. But because Europe in the Renaissance was divided among 2,000 principalities, it was never the case that there was one idiot in command of all Europe who could abolish a whole technology. Inventors had lots of chances, there was always competition between different states, and when one state tried something out that proved valuable, the other states saw the opportunity and adopted it. So the real question is, why was China chronically unified, and why was Europe chronically disunified? Why is Europe disunified to this day?
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