Becoming a millionaire is such a popular topic. However, sometimes we overlook living a fulfilled life and just want that label, millionaire. We must endeavor to live a productive life by seeking to better those around us. If you have the vision, create a product, pump in passion and deliver to make things better for people. That is one sure way of becoming a millionaire. Most of the million dollar persons we hear of today have added value to people’s lives: Bill Gates, Sergey Brin, Larry Page and Me, Mcneri! Add value, live your life and IT WILL COME.

Before you really roll up your sleeves and monetize your personal or professional skills, why not right-size your life? Selling your unwanted stuff is a great way to downsize and declutter your life while earning some income on the side. If you’re transitioning to full-time work-at-home status, that income could provide a critical boost to your plans for a proper home office, or allow you to maintain your lifestyle during lean times without resorting to voluntary simplicity.

My wife picked up immediately on the problem of "weapons of mass destruction" — to use the euphemistic cliche. Are we to sit back and accept that the regulation of such things is inevitably going to fail, and that we are somehow wickedly misguided to try, putting ourselves in the anachronistic position of the Japanese samurai class, vis a vis guns, or the Chinese emperors and navies? Or can we accept that really novel dangers have to be met with really novel approaches?
I couldn’t disagree more. The concept of systematic saving and hoping for a solid average return in the markets isn’t something that I believe in anymore. I’m 32, and have been investing in the markets since I was 18, under the assumption that if I set up automatic contributions throughout my life I would ultimately be “rich”. I started by maxing out my SEP-IRA and then by maxing my Roth. I invest monthly in a range of products, again, all with the goal of cost averaging the market to my benefit over time. Fast forward 14 years from when I began, and I have accumulated less than $60k. My invested dollar amount exceeds my current total, as it did even at the recent market highs in 2007. In other words, investing for the long haul doesn’t work like it used to, particularly for my generation. The first decade of wage earning is the most important in terms of compounding interest, and we have just experienced a completely lost decade. The hopes for recovery to make up for that lost decade (14 yrs in my case) do not appear reasonable. David

I cannot thank you enough for the info you provided! I went back to work before my son turned 4. Now he’s 12 & I feel like I’ve missed out on so many summers & just time together because I’m working 5 days a week. I plan to take a serious look at the opportunities you listed and hopefully I can find a way to stay home and still earn an income. Plus, I drive 60 miles a day, saving almost $300 a month in gas alone would go a long way! Thank you, thank you, thank you!

I’ve been employed since the age of 14, and now, some 43 years later, I’ve been forced to end my beloved career because of chronic pain (I’ve endured 8 spinal surgeries which included the replacing my lower spine with a titanium rod) and my constant struggle of ensuring my depression remains totally in remission, has left me with an existence rather than a life.

The best part is that people who use bed and breakfasts are more likely to pay more for the experience. The challenge is that there’s a lot of competition in this field, so if you think earning money this way is right for you, you’ll have to set up your home in a way that makes for a memorable experience for guests. Here’s a checklist to get you started:

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