If you do this strategically, you’ll likely get positive results. Pick five to six people you know who have positions similar to yours, whether they work for the same company or a different one. Invite them to lunch or coffee, and make the ask in person, since email and text message will be much easier to dodge than face-to-face. And explain why you’re asking. Say something like, “I’m in the job market/I’m conducting research to ask for a raise/I’m applying for a promotion, and I’m polling several colleagues who have jobs like ours so I can calculate a realistic salary range when I negotiate my pay. I would really appreciate if you could disclose your salary to me, since you’re in a role similar to mine, and I really respect you as a professional in this industry.” If they say no, tell them that you understand and that if they happen to change their mind to reach out. If they say yes, thank them profusely, and then follow up with them afterwards to let them know the result. Especially if you get a positive result, they’ll likely be happy to know that disclosing their salary helped a colleague advance in their career.


There you have an example from the German beer industry about the disadvantages of having lots of small groups that are secretive and don't compete with each other. The other example that I want to tell you about is the Japanese food-processing industry. I mentioned that we Americans are virtually paranoid about the efficiency of the Japanese, and it's true for some Japanese industries, but not for their food-processing industry. Japanese processed food is produced with an efficiency 32% of American processed foods. There are 67,000 food processing companies in Japan; there are only 21,000 in the United States, although the U.S. has double Japan's population, so the average food-processing company in the United States is six times bigger than its Japanese counterpart. What is the reason why the Japanese food-processing industry, like German beer industries, consists of small companies with local monopolies?
Bloggers are typically people who enjoy a particular topic and enjoy writing about it on a semi-regular to regular basis. If you have something you are passionate about, or are an expert in a particular area, you can consider starting a blog. Blogs are a great way to: teach people about a particular skill, entertain, or share about life experiences.
Before you really roll up your sleeves and monetize your personal or professional skills, why not right-size your life? Selling your unwanted stuff is a great way to downsize and declutter your life while earning some income on the side. If you’re transitioning to full-time work-at-home status, that income could provide a critical boost to your plans for a proper home office, or allow you to maintain your lifestyle during lean times without resorting to voluntary simplicity.

The HOME Income Limits are calculated using the same methodology that HUD uses for calculating the income limits for the Section 8 program, in accordance with Section 3(b)(2) of the U.S. Housing Act of 1937, as amended. These limits are based on HUD estimates of median family income, with adjustments based on family size.  Please note that the 30 percent income limits for the HOME program have been calculated based on the definition of Extremely Low–Income Family (ELI) as described in Consolidated Submission for CPD Programs section of 24 CFR part 91.5. Therefore, the ELI Limit is calculated as 30 percent of median family income for the area and may not be the same as the Section 8 ELI Limit for your jurisdiction. The Section 8 Limit is calculated based on the definition of ELI as described in The 2014 Consolidated Appropriations Act, (Section 238 on page 128 Stat 635) which defines ELI as very low–income families whose incomes do not exceed the higher of the Federal poverty level or 30% of area median income.
Home-based work can be broken down into two separate categories: jobs where you work for yourself (and have unlimited income potential) and jobs in which you work for somebody else (with an income ceiling). Neither type necessarily requires you to work full-time. However, these are all online jobs – which means you’ll need a high-speed internet connection in order to work from home.
Content is what drives web traffic. Websites are always pumping out fresh, new content for their readers, and they are always looking for writers! If you aren’t quite ready to launch your own blog yet, this might be a good option to see if writing is for you. Since competition is high, we don’t recommend starting from scratch as a freelance writer. Want to see success faster? Learn from a veteran, six-figure freelance writer.
Finances. You need to be good at quick math and be able to make quick decisions. You have to be careful how much you pay for a book, and then keep careful track of the expenses involved in selling it. For instance, when you sell on a website, they’ll take a commission from the sale. In addition, some sites, like eBay, will charge you a listing fee for each book. If you request that your money be deposited via PayPal, then you’ll be charged a transaction fee per book. If you’re not careful, the fees will quickly negate your profits.
Holly fell into freelance writing on a whim. She submitted several pitches for guest posts and ended up landing a few clients. After roughly 6 months of freelancing on the side, she was making enough money to replace her income and work at home full-time. Now, she makes over $200,000 a year from writing alone. Not bad for a home-based business, eh?
That might be why we have on-demand everything. We live in a society where fast food is prevalent and exists on nearly every corner or town across the United States and we're able to access all of the world's information in real time from anywhere we want from little pocket super computers. We can hail rides, find dates and do everything in a flash, instantaneously. Clearly, we want to lose weight and get right quickly and not have to wait, purely because our ids are so powerful.

In college I earned a good amount of money by flipping our car.  I took the old beat up piece of junk car we already owned and listed it on Craigslist for about $800 more than I thought it was worth.  It took a while to sell at the higher price, but it eventually did!  Then I bought another car with the additional $800.  I flipped my car about 4 times per year (my state only allows 5 sales per year before you have to be a dealer) and each time rolled the earnings into a new car.  Eventually we had a much better car and it hadn’t cost us a dime.

My use of the word "secrets" in the title of this article might have brought you here hoping for a guaranteed, almost magical solution to make you wealthy. There isn't one. The fundamental objectives are simple: Make more than you spend, and use the excess to invest wisely. How you invest is up to you (with a few caveats below), but the obvious goal is to make investments that have a high likelihood of making you more money in the future. That's it. The ways to achieve this are by making more money, spending less, and investing more wisely.
What Employees Say: “Communication is a must due to fully remote workforce so everyone makes an extra effort to communicate. We treat our employees great and in the US we have recently upgraded our benefits plans to be more family friendly. I find it is easier for me (not everyone) to stay focused while working from home. My quick breaks of throwing in a load of laundry or running the dishwasher between meetings also helps me in my work/life balance!” —Current Employee
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