If you want to be a millionaire, it helps to know what you want, and then have the discipline to go after it. When you set a goal, you focus on it and pursue it. This means that you don’t get sidetracked by less important matters. If you know that you need to set $1,000 a month aside in order to meet your millionaire goal within an allotted timeframe, you focus on that. You cut expenses or, better yet, look for ways to increase your income, so that you can meet your goal. Sometimes it’s not fun, but millionaires usually stick with it.
Okay, let's now start to apply all this to what we should do if we want to try to go out and get rich. Let's apply this to some affluent modern industries and companies. I'll give you two examples. The first example concerns that image of productivity that we Americans have as we look toward Japan. We fantasize that the industrial productivity of Japan and Germany is greater than that of the United States. And that's not true. On the average, American industrial productivity is higher than the industrial productivity of either Japan or Germany. But that average figure conceals differences among the industries of the same country, related to differences in organization — and those differences are very instructive. Let me give you two examples from case studies carried out by the McKinsey Corporation, an economics study industry based in Washington. These two examples involve the German beer industry and the Japanese food-processing industry.
I’ll be more than a millionaire, I don’t doubt it at all. The hardest part is starting your way up the curve, since that’s when the snowball process of compounding takes the longest to kick off. Once you reach a critical mass, the last… say… third or fourth of the journey will be relatively easy. If you’re in the right investment allocation, the real question is how soon can you make it to $750,000 in net worth? Or how soon can you start bringing in income from a second investment property? No, friends, a million is not far off at all…

Another benefit of giving to charity is that people perceive you as a better person when you give to causes they care about. They are likely to trust you more when they see that you aren’t intent on hoarding the money they give you, and that doing so will benefit their community in turn. Of course, the tax benefits of giving to charity are also a great incentive to do so.

When I started to work from home, I missed talking to people. A lot. But I soon found a friend. Every day, I would hear the UPS guy gunning his motor as he drove down my long driveway to deliver my packages. As soon as I would spot him, I’d fly out of the house and chat him up. And now he leaves the packages by the curb. Sure, the one big bonus of working from home is that it gets you away from the petty office politics and never-ending gossip.
Central to all of this is redefining what it means to be rich. If you need a huge home and an expensive car to “feel” rich, then this advice won’t work for you. But if you define affluence as the ability to spend time with friends and family, to travel, to do work you love and to stop worrying about money, then living below your means is all it takes.
Español: hacerte rico, Deutsch: Reich werden, Português: Ficar Rico, Nederlands: Rijk worden, Français: devenir riche, Italiano: Arricchirsi, Русский: стать богатым, 中文: 才能变得富有, Čeština: Jak zbohatnout, Bahasa Indonesia: Menjadi Kaya, 日本語: お金持ちになる, हिन्दी: अमीर बनें, العربية: أن تصبح غنيًا, Tiếng Việt: Trở nên Giàu có, 한국어: 부자가 되는 방법(미국), Türkçe: Nasıl Zengin Olunur

When it comes to at-home income, selling your unwanted stuff is the definition of “low-hanging fruit.” Even if you’re resolutely intentional in your purchasing habits, you surely have possessions that you can do without: old kids’ clothing and toys, disused sporting goods, out-of-fashion wardrobe accessories, electronics, entertainment, valuable but non-sentimental keepsakes such as watches and jewelry, broken-in furniture, dusty tools and outdoor equipment, and perhaps even big-ticket items like a motorcycle or second car.
Two thoughts come to mind. First, at 27 you have a whole life in front of you, so whatever you do will be right if it is directed correctly. Second, pick a goal and work towards it (e.g., pay off medical debt; or pay off condo mortgage). Always remember, as you succeed in any one of these, then you can broaden out into other investments opportunities (e.g., stocks, mutual funds, real estates, etc.). The choice and timing are yours to call. My basic point; however, is while you are young “focus” on a GOAL and go after the goal aggressively.
I have a question. I am 24 and I just started selling commercial insurance. My wife and I have about 70 k in student loans which we plan on paying back asap. I am going to have an additional 10k on top of my salary next year which I plan on saving until the end of the year and allocating it as I see fit. Everything I read says “compounding interest is the bomb” but then says “don’t save, pay down debt”. Now, I hate debt but I want to take full advantage of our young age and compounding interest. What would you recommend I do with extra 10k if we already put and extra $200 towards debt a month and we have an emegency fund in place? Fully Fund our IRA’s for the year or pay down a loan? I feel like there is no right or wrong answer. Your thoughts?
I feel focus and discipline flow in my spine to make complete change, now that had appeared to make several mistake due to lack of mentorship, guidance and motivation, how and where should I begin. However I’m the sole breadwinner taking care of Mum, Wife and children but willing to help the poor and needy, the vulnerable in our society. Can I achieve the millionaire dream?

Service. Another key aspect of successful B&Bs is the level of service that the hosts provide. You’re not just offering room and board, but an experience. If they need help planning a day seeing the sites, offer to sit down with them and help them plan their itinerary. If a businessperson needs copies for a presentation, offer to go and make them. Remember, your job as host will be to make your guests’ stays as comfortable and pleasurable as possible. If you succeed, they’ll remember you the next time they travel through your town.
As someone who's acutely interested in passive income and online marketing, I speak to a great deal of people who are successful, but rarely do I personally come across someone who's had such an immensely interesting journey that it screams attention. While success is certainly alluring, most people don't have the wherewithal to suffer through such life-altering and suffocating failures, and to not only reemerge on the shores of hope, but to create a life of sheer and utter abundance in the process.

Great message, Jeff. When I look at big goals, or even incremental goals, I like to break them down into bite size bits. Earning $100,000 a year seems difficult in many situations, but it seems easier when you break it down to $8,350 a month, or roughly $280 a day. Sure, that is aggressive for many salaries, but there are many ways to fill the gaps with side income, owning a small business, consulting, freelance work, etc. The same concept works for any number or goal you want to reach. Find out where you are, and what it will take to reach the next step. It’s much more attainable when you make incremental goals.
For example, if you register for free with Textbroker.com and submit a writing sample, you’ll receive a rating based on your content quality. Then you can choose which projects you want based on your quality rating and earn 0.7 cent to 5 cents per word, or more. FreelanceWriting.com provides a long list of freelance writing opportunities culled from several top sites. Many of the recent listings offered hourly rates of $25 or more. For $21 a month, you can join Mediabistro’s freelance marketplace to post your qualifications for review by media managers seeking writers.
Ask for a raise. If you’re unhappy with your compensation at your 9-5 job, asking for a raise is one way to beef up your bank account. Most employers offer an annual review of your work – which could be the perfect time to negotiate a higher salary or ask for better perks. If your employer doesn’t offer such an opportunity, it might be time to initiate a review yourself.
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