Greetings Alexa, AWESOME post.. you really have hit on everything. I went the blogging route.. and love it. Yet I didn’t start there.. as I looked through your list I had to chuckle.. as I remember doing the customer service from home.. See I’m a single mom.. my oldest is now 14 and I started searching for work from home opportunities when she was 1 years old.. I built everything up… and have been full time when my oldest turned 13!! Started by exchanging time for money.. with the customer service and that kept me in the place of having to exchange time for money.. so I decided to build my own business.. and this is what set me FREE.. Love your post as it really leads one through the journey of a VERY possible life.. Thanks so much for putting this information together. Keep Smiling!
2) it would likely be easier to emulate what some of these big MLM girls are doing with their FB groups. Rather than advertise your products on FB, look for ways to build a page with a large following of interested users. A lot of these Lula Roe girls that do exceptionally well have large facebook pages with 10,000+ likes they “go live” on facebook and have Lula Roe parties showing off their goods/sales.

#48 – Stitch Fix – Read review – If you are a fashionista with a creative eye, try Stitch Fix a company that allows you to share fashion tips with clients on the site. For work at home stylist, Stitch Fix offers a $16+ an hour pay. As a requirement, you must be 18 years of age or more and be ready to attend their off-site training before starting the job.
The best part is that people who use bed and breakfasts are more likely to pay more for the experience. The challenge is that there’s a lot of competition in this field, so if you think earning money this way is right for you, you’ll have to set up your home in a way that makes for a memorable experience for guests. Here’s a checklist to get you started:
Central to all of this is redefining what it means to be rich. If you need a huge home and an expensive car to “feel” rich, then this advice won’t work for you. But if you define affluence as the ability to spend time with friends and family, to travel, to do work you love and to stop worrying about money, then living below your means is all it takes.

The other lesson that I would like to draw from history concerns what is called the optimal fragmentation principle. Namely, if you've got a human group, whether the human group is the staff of this museum, or your business, or the German beer industry, or Route 128, is that group best organized as a single large unit, or is it best organized as a number of small units, or is it best fragmented into a lot of small units? What's the most effective organization of the groups?


A second topic I really like is the fallacy of the great idea. You do not need some great, original idea to be successful. Really all you need to do is take an existing idea and put a new spin on it. Do it better than anyone else. Combine two existing ideas that have not been combined so far. Take a look at Mcdonalds. They do not make the best hamburger in the world. They are not even close. But they do the whole process better than anyone else. The idea is not important, the proper execution of the idea is where the money lies.
Research Pricing (And Set Fair Starting Prices): Before setting prices for each item, research your local Craigslist website and (if possible) nearby yard sales to get a sense of how to price them. Remember that many buyers will try to haggle – so set prices a bit higher than your bottom dollar, but not so high that you’ll scare off first bids. 10% to 15% is a good rule of thumb. Consider bunching low-value items, such as old CDs, into lots of five or 10, or offer x-for-$y deals.
The cash back industry is ruthlessly competitive, isn’t it!? All of these apps want new users, which means you can load up on welcome bonuses. The Ibotta app is another opportunity to get a bonus: they are giving people $10 when they sign up. Unlike the other apps mentioned in this article, Ibotta specializes in getting you cash back at grocery stores.
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