*This opportunity is for an independent contractor and consecutive hours on the road may not exceed specified limits. Stated trip earnings of $304.34/week are based on 20 hours of driving per week using the net median national earnings of driver partners from December 2018. Median earnings in your specific location may be lower than the national figure. Actual earnings vary depending on number of rides accepted and taken, time of day, location and other factors.
I gave this a 4 star because it was a good tale of truth but it didn't say anything all that new or amazing. I liked the story because I could relate to the time period and to my own reactions to the experiences I personally had during that same time as I took my turn at becoming rich. It was accurate based on my experiences...every single thing he wrote. But the hardest part then becomes keeping it.
Ebates is another cash back app, similar to Dosh, and right now they are offering a $10 signup bonus. There’s no rule saying you can’t have multiple cash back apps, so why not sign up for a couple just so you get the bonuses? Once you get your bonuses, then just use whichever app gets you the best deal on your upcoming purchases. Easiest money ever!
The result is that Japanese food-processing industries are not exposed to domestic competition, they're all local monopolies, they're not exposed to foreign competition, and they don't learn the best methods in the international trade for producing food. And the result is that, in Japan, Japanese beef costs $200 a pound. My wife and I had heard about that before we went to Japan, but what we did not realize until we were brought into a supermarket by my wife's Japanese cousin is that chicken in Japan costs $25 a pound. The reason the Japanese can get away with that is that Japanese chicken producers are not exposed to competition with super-efficient American chicken producers.         
If you’ve got some free time and don’t live in the middle of nowhere, becoming a Lyft driver can be a very lucrative side hustle that allows you make money fast. And right now, they’ve got a promotion going on where any new driver will instantly get a $300 bonus after completing their 100th ride. If you start now and hustle hard on the weekends, you can probably unlock that bonus within a few weeks of driving (and that’s in addition to your normal earnings).
Harris, I think it depends on several factors. First, I recommend having a well established emergency fund that will be enough to cover several months living expenses. This will help you cover any unexpected expenses and avoid taking out additional debt. Next consider other short/medium term goals. For example, are you saving to buy a house, do you need to replace your car in the next two or three years, etc. Finally, consider the interest rates of your student loans and what you may be able to earn in an IRA and decide which option is best for your needs. Investing for retirement now could be a huge benefit for you and your wife when you reach retirement age, but eliminating debt increases cash flow and gives you peace of mind. Both options are solid. Best of luck.

This side hustle can easily become a full-time job! If you’ve got expertise in an area and think you can help small businesses near you, give this a shot. For instance, Ben and I know a lot about running Facebook advertising campaigns, so we approached the owner of our gym if he would let us design a few campaigns for him. And of course, he was thrilled to get the help! Here’s a useful 18 Step Checklist for Becoming a Small Business Consultant.

401k: Be sure to take advantage of your employer’s 401k plan by putting at least enough money to collect the employer match into it. This basically means that for every dollar you contribute, your company will match that (pre-tax!). This ensures you’re taking full advantage of what is essentially free money from your employer. That match is POWERFUL and can double your money over the course of your working life:
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I am curious about your response to this. I do know some people who have their own companies posting for clients and getting paid around the same dollar amount per post. The only thing this guy doesn’t mention is that you might have to interface with a client to get the info they want posted. I kinda figured their would be a “big ticket” after the 99 bucks. Do you know of any legitimate opportunities to do postings for companies who just do not want to have to bother with doing it for themselves? Thanks in advance and I look forward to your reply.
It occurred to me that you’re probably interested in growing your blog. I might be able to help. I’ve done video editing (http://www.fakesamplesite.com) and PowerPoint design (http://www.anotherfakesite.com). Imagine doing a great video on using virtual assistants, then distributing it through your newsletter. I could do one for you in about 2 days if you’re interested.
In addition, I've been talking about conditions to maximize productivity and creativity and moneymaking ability. There are other considerations in organized human groups, and there are conditions under which productivity is not the thing you're most interested in. There are conditions where more centralization may be appropriate. For example, during a war, you do not want your air force, army, and navy to be fiercely competing with each other, but instead you want during a war more centralized control than you do in peace time. And there are also human groups for which productivity and differential money-making ability are not the overriding consideration. I don't want you to go home tonight and each of you to say to your spouse or significant other, "Darling, I've just heard this guy Jared Diamond, who says that within human groups competition is what spurs productivity and innovation, and so I think we need to follow his advice in our household. For the next month let's see which of us earns a bigger income, and at the end of the month the bigger income-producer will keep on with the job, and the one of us who has lower income and is less efficient can turn to scrubbing the floors and shopping at the supermarkets." That just illustrates: there are other considerations in a marriage than optimizing productivity.
Hmmm… my 12 year old daughter has gone through almost 4 different sizes in the last couple of years. I have jeans and tops – some with the tags still on them, some only worn by her once or twice. I bet I have at least 50 or more pairs of just jeans… mostly very expensive jeans!! Is there another kind, lol? I hate to have a lot of people come to our home. Would I lose a lot of money by selling them online as opposed to a yard sale? I also have quite a few other items I really need to get rid of because they’re just sitting in my shed, taking up space. Do you have any advice on how to get the maximum money for these items (mainly the girl’s clothing)? Thanks!!

The first batch of natural experiments concerns understanding the effects of isolation and of group size and of communication with other groups on the productivity of human societies. Let's learn from the extreme examples of isolation of human societies. If isolation has any effect on human societies, the places we're most likely to see that effect are the histories of those two islands off southeastern Australia called Tasmania and Flinders Island. They lie about 200 miles off the southeast coast of Australia and are separated today from Australia by Bass Straits, but those straits are relatively shallow, so their floor lay above sea level at glacial times of low sea level up to about 10,000 years ago. The Bass Straits between Tasmania and Australia were then dry land, and Tasmania was part of the Australian mainland, just as Britain used to be part of the European mainland. When the glaciers melted, sea level rose and cut off Tasmania from the Australian mainland. So when Tasmania and Flinders were part of the Australian mainland, Australian Aborigines walked down to Tasmania and Flinders from the mainland.         

I feel that circumstances really do alter cases. At this point in history Microsoft looks spectacularly successful, and Big Blue and ATT less so. We should remember that ATT lasted a century, however, in spite of many mistakes. (And even now, it is possible for a Lucent scientist to claim , — "they couldn't kill us".) We are as always at a unique point of growth of a particular type of economic entity, and what is successful now has more to do with when we are than with any universal laws. I accept that Diamond's hypotheses in his book explained the past; but prediction is hard, especially of the future.


When Europeans discovered Tasmania in the 17th century, it had technologically the simplest, most "primitive" human society of any society in the modern world. Native Tasmanians could not light a fire from scratch, they did not have bone tools, they did not have multi-piece stone tools, they did not have axes with handles, they did not have spear-throwers, they did not have boomerangs, and they did not even know how to fish. What accounts for this extreme simplicity of Tasmania society? Part of the explanation is that during the 10,000 years of isolation, the Aboriginal Australians, who numbered about 250,000, were inventing things that the isolated 4,000 Tasmanians were not inventing, such as boomerangs. Incredibly, though, archeological investigations have shown one other thing: during those 10,000 years of isolation, the Tasmanians actually lost some technologies that they had carried from the Australian mainland to Tasmania. Notably, the Tasmanians arrived in Tasmania with bone tools, and bone tools disappear from archeological record about 3,000 years ago. That's incredible, because with bone tools you can have needles, and with needles you can have warm clothing. Tasmania is at the latitude of Vladivostok and Chicago: it's snowy in the winter, and yet the Tasmanians went about either naked or just with a cape thrown over the shoulder.
In the USA a pyramid scheme is federally illegal whether on the internet or not. For this to be running as long as it has it seems it may be coming out of another country that our government/police system can not combat (or just maybe the correct authorities have not been contacted, and yes they can be tracked). I do believe in freedom of the internet but at the same time I feel countries should try to help the world to combat this. Lost cause. Ahh, and to think we are all human with some of us missing a working brain part called empathy.
Do you search the Internet? Want to get paid for it? Swagbucks is a site that rewards you for doing various online tasks like taking surveys, watching videos, and using their search engine. When using their search engine, you get reward points after several searches, usually in the amount of 10-15 points. You can start cashing out rewards at the 500 points mark.
So these stories of isolated societies illustrate two general principles about relations between human group size and innovation or creativity. First, in any society except a totally isolated society, most innovations come in from the outside, rather than being conceived within that society. And secondly, any society undergoes local fads. By fads I mean a custom that does not make economic sense. Societies either adopt practices that are not profitable or for whatever reasons abandon practices that are profitable. But usually those fads are reversed, as a result of the societies next door without the fads out-competing the society with the fad, or else as a result of the society with the fad, like those European princes who gave up the guns, realizing they're making a big mistake and reacquiring the fad. In short, competition between human societies that are in contact with each other is what drives the invention of new technology and the continued availability of technology. Only in an isolated society, where there's no competition and no source of reintroduction, can one of these fads result in the permanent loss of a valuable technology. So that's one of the two sets of lessons that I want to draw from history, about what happens in a really isolated society and group.         
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The job: Listen up, take notes and get paid. Transcribe Anywhere offers online transcription courses that teach students how to transcribe and also how to start their own freelance transcribing businesses. The online course will lead you through modules, practice dictations and quizzes. It even shows you how to create a website and how to secure clients.

You've seen that effect even in modern times. Twenty years ago, a few idiots in control of the world's most populous nation were able to shut down the educational system for one billion people at the time of the Great Cultural Revolution, whereas it's impossible for a few idiots to shut down the educational system of all of Europe. This suggests, then, that Europe's fragmentation was a great advantage to Europe as far as technological and scientific innovation is concerned. Does this mean that a high degree of fragmentation is even better? Probably not. India was geographically even more fragmented than Europe, but India was not technologically as innovative as Europe. And this suggests that there is an optimal intermediate degree of fragmentation, that a too-unified society is a disadvantage, and a too-fragmented society is also a disadvantage. Instead, innovation proceeds most rapidly in a society with some intermediate degree of fragmentation.
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