Once you have that problem or need nailed, the next step is to validate that idea and make sure you’ve actually got customers who will pay for it. This means building a minimum viable product, getting objective feedback from real customers, incorporating updates, testing the market for demand, and getting pricing feedback to ensure there’s enough of a margin between your costs and what consumers are willing to pay.
When it comes to at-home income, selling your unwanted stuff is the definition of “low-hanging fruit.” Even if you’re resolutely intentional in your purchasing habits, you surely have possessions that you can do without: old kids’ clothing and toys, disused sporting goods, out-of-fashion wardrobe accessories, electronics, entertainment, valuable but non-sentimental keepsakes such as watches and jewelry, broken-in furniture, dusty tools and outdoor equipment, and perhaps even big-ticket items like a motorcycle or second car.

The free app, Trim, lets you save money with automation and within a few days, I saved an extra $100. I linked my financial accounts and Trim went to work. It found ways to lower my bills and cancel subscriptions; negotiate my cable, internet, and cell phone bill and found subscriptions to cancel. It even helped analyze my spending habits. It can easily find ways to save you money and remember it’s 100% free.
Suzanne lives in Texas and has been a full-time freelance writer for 20 years. She’s written for numerous business and financial publications, both online and in traditional print media. She also owns her own small business and has a passion to help others achieve their dreams of financial independence. Her goal is to eventually work from a remote island that is equipped with Wi-Fi.
Great article, I have tried a few over the years. I had a side business cleaning offices for years. It did great, but I hated never being able to take more than 3-4 days vacation, so I eventually gave up. I tried MTurk, but if you multiplied my earnings on an hourly basis, it was a little over $6/hr. My blog is much worse, probably less than $0.25/hr.
Yes, it just depends what you’re looking to get into. For the past year and a half I’ve worked about 20 hours a week writing for blogs and have pulled in anywhere from $2,000 – $3,000 per month. Now I’m doing more virtual assistant work and in the next few months should bring in quite a bit more money. (I’ll also be working 40 hours per week though)
There’s plenty of work and clients to be found. If you know where to look. To start, you need to know if there is enough demand for your skill to make it worth the effort to go out looking for work. Start by searching for freelance postings on sites like Flexjobs, SolidGigs, Contena, greatcontent or one of the dozens of other skill-specific freelance job boards.
I fear your wonderful advice comes too late for me. I am 58 years old and have no job skills. The world is a wonderful place for you young people who have jobs and a meaningful life, but for someone like me it is difficult to want to keep going. I feel antiquated and out-of-date. I will never be a millionaire–not even close! What is even worse is that my two grown sons can only find part-time, minimum wage jobs and both of them went to college.
This is a great and comprehensive article, but the website/search engine evaluating jobs and the transcriber jobs I checked out that I think I’d be a good fit for require 3-5 years of experience each, and as a college student, I don’t have that. Are there any decent paying (50-200 dollars a month) jobs that don’t require experience in the job field yet?

While I think that your initial response to Phillip’s suggestion about design was a little too strong, Dasjung, I’ve got to chime in here and observe that Phil, ThunderCock and Dumbass, by resorting to name calling and simplistic reasoning, come across as very lacking in both decorum and sensitivity.  If a guy wants to expect, even demand, high quality in his field of choice, I beleive he has a right, if not a responsibility, to do so!  Also, Dumbass, be careful who you call Dumbass. You just show YOUR true colors by doing so. 


Developing the discipline it takes to pay yourself first is a process, and so it’s helpful to use automation tools to help hold yourself accountable. You can set up automatic paycheck deductions for your 401(k) or IRA so that savings is automatically deducted. You can also use a savings platform or application to set up automatic savings contributions.
Do you search the Internet? Want to get paid for it? Swagbucks is a site that rewards you for doing various online tasks like taking surveys, watching videos, and using their search engine. When using their search engine, you get reward points after several searches, usually in the amount of 10-15 points. You can start cashing out rewards at the 500 points mark.
I have tried to sign up & complete cash for surveys in the past and then felt like I was being led down a rabitt’s hole, going from one “skip” and/or “submit” to another without ever, seemingly, actually completing the entire process.  So, when I saw CashCrate recommended in ptmoney.com, I thought it was going to be more straight forward, but, alas, no, I entered the rabitt’s hole once again, coming up for air only after an entire hour spent hopping, skipping, and jumpring all over the place, netting 25 cents in earnings!  Has this been anyone else’s experience and what has been done to remedy the situation?  It seems like there must exist an insider’s trick or, at least, know-how that I am missing. 
Can someone help. I need a job or at least a hobbie to do at home, i need to make $400 in about 2 weeks. I’m 15 so i can’t work yet. If anyone has any suggestions please e-mail me! ooh & btw i can’t mow any lawns cause everyone who lives close by dosn’t have any lawn at all. So if there is any suggestions whatsoever please feel free to e-mail me. thanks!
Today, not only do we live in an exhilarating time filled with endless possibilities thanks to technology that we once considered to live in the realm of science fiction, but it's also a period that's deeply steeped in the expectancy of instant and real-time returns. The truth is that you can't get rich overnight. It takes hard work and effort. It takes persistence and massive amounts of action. It takes seeing things through and pushing past failure, even as much as you want to give up and throw in that proverbial towel.
Do you search the Internet? Want to get paid for it? Swagbucks is a site that rewards you for doing various online tasks like taking surveys, watching videos, and using their search engine. When using their search engine, you get reward points after several searches, usually in the amount of 10-15 points. You can start cashing out rewards at the 500 points mark.
Rather than making money through subscriptions, YouTube channels are based on a traditional advertising system. Meaning the more viewers you get, the more you make. Once you’re approved for the YouTube Partner Program and can start including ads on your videos, with every 1,000 views, you will make approximately $2-$4. Which might not seem like a lot, but if you have 100 videos with 5,000 views a month each, that would be $1,000–$2,000 already. Just imagine if your videos start hitting millions of views!

Stay rich. It's hard to get rich, but it's even harder to stay rich. Your wealth is always going to be affected by the market, and the market has its ups and downs. If you get too comfortable when times are good, you'll quickly drop back to square one when the market hits a slump. If you get a promotion or a raise, or if your ROI goes up a percentage point, don't spend the extra. Save it for when business is slow and your ROI goes down two percentage points.


Advertising. You’ll need to get the word out about your sewing business, and one of the best places to start is with your friends and neighbors. Make sure they are all aware of your services and are willing to pass around your business cards. In addition, you should put up fliers in local fabric stores and get to know the employees so that if someone asks, they’ll be able to refer you. Any business needs a website, and yours will be no exception; you can put up a simple one that outlines what you do, and tells the reader what kinds of prices to expect. Finally, by joining organizations like the American Sewing Guild, you’ll be able to stay in touch with others who are doing the same thing as you.
This is one that a lot of people have already done. I was in my Uber the other day and my driver was talking about Bitcoin. He told me he deposited $50 into Coinbase and it’s now at $150 in a few weeks. That’s a 33% return! If you wanted to try something this volatile, it’s at your own risk but only put up money your willing to lose. The risk is high, but the reward is high too. If you wanted to get in on the action, you can do it with the Coinbase app. If you sign up through this link and invest $100 then Coinbase will deposit $10 in your account – that’s 10% right there! Only invest what you can afford to lose.

I’ll be more than a millionaire, I don’t doubt it at all. The hardest part is starting your way up the curve, since that’s when the snowball process of compounding takes the longest to kick off. Once you reach a critical mass, the last… say… third or fourth of the journey will be relatively easy. If you’re in the right investment allocation, the real question is how soon can you make it to $750,000 in net worth? Or how soon can you start bringing in income from a second investment property? No, friends, a million is not far off at all…


Open an Etsy store. If you have a creative talent or skill – whether it’s creating art, sewing clothes, or making keepsakes – you can open an online store on Etsy.com and sell your wares for some quick cash. With your own Etsy store, you’re left in charge of pricing and, ultimately, how much you make. See our detailed primer, “How to Make Money on Etsy.”
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Word! Just because you aren’t a professional doesn’t mean you can’t have a good amount of talent in a subject. If you can provide quality services to people who can’t or don’t want to pay high professional prices, then go for it! That’s the free market right there. You have just as much right to try and make money for yourself and your family from your talents as professionals do.
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