Word! Just because you aren’t a professional doesn’t mean you can’t have a good amount of talent in a subject. If you can provide quality services to people who can’t or don’t want to pay high professional prices, then go for it! That’s the free market right there. You have just as much right to try and make money for yourself and your family from your talents as professionals do.
This is pretty much the same position as an in-house recruiter except you get to work wherever you want. The other major difference is that you search the web to find the right employee for the right position. You’re also responsible for screening the applicant and being a part of the interviewing and negotiation process. Some recruiters are paid upward of $125 an hour for building resume templates.
Well, Thank You for allowing me to vent a little. And, I’m certainly not the only person experiencing such hardships so if you don’t object, I’m going to now “Pay this Forward” as a possible solution to others in my position and, maybe, just maybe, this will lighten the load for those of us that has carried the weight of the Universe on our shoulders for more years than we are comfortable to admit.
 @dasjung No doubt! I know this and you know this, and any other highly skilled and educated designer will also know this. But what about the customers? The people who are looking for a logo design with much consideration of price in this economy.  Knowledge and talent expect the monetary reimbursement it deserves, but unless everybody has a trained eye to recognize it, they just aren’t going to dish out the money for it. That is the point I am trying to make. It is like calling the neighborhood handyman instead of  a high cost plumber to fix a small leak.
People need your help and they will pay you for it. Seriously. The “gigs” section of Craigslist.com is a classic place to find jobs, as is the bulletin board at your local church. We wrote a post on all the places to find work. Traditional job search sites can be over saturated with applicants but non-traditional places, as mentioned, can provide you a means for earning some extra income. You just have to be a go-getter and get hungry to find them. You could consider driving for Doordash If you click this link and make a purchase, we earn a commission at no additional cost to you. or downloading the TaskRabbit app which has a plethora of ideas. Click here to get $20 credit If you click this link and make a purchase, we earn a commission at no additional cost to you. when hiring from TaskRabbit.
Even though risk-taking is a generally rewarding strategy in your 20s and 30s, it's also a good idea to diversify your efforts. Don't build up just one skill set, or one set of professional connections. Don't rely on one type of investment, and don't gamble all your savings on one venture. Instead, try to set up multiple income streams, generate several backup plans for your goals and businesses, and hedge your bets by looking for new opportunities everywhere. This will protect you from catastrophic losses, and increase your chances of striking it big in one of your ventures.
Thanks for stopping by. Do you/have you ever spent time on the consulting side of things? Each time I see a very specific skill-set like this, it typically leads to some sort of suggestion that revolves around remotely helping other industry experts. Specifically, creating and hosting your own website, and then learning how to use paid media/search engine optimization to market yourself as some sort of construction consultant.
Comfort. Perhaps the biggest thing that you’ll need to do in order to create a successful B&B is to make sure that your guests are as comfortable as they can be. Remember, they’re paying more for the experience of being comfortable away from home. As a trial, spend a night in the room in your house that you intend to rent and view things from a guest’s point of view. Is the temperature comfortable? Is the bath in the room, or at least a comfortable distance away while still being private? Is the bed soft and inviting? The pillows? Is the bedroom interior design, including colors, soothing? Can you hear household noises, or do you feel that you’re in a world of your own? All of these are important questions to ask yourself, but the answers will determine whether or not your guests recommend your place, or come back for another stay. Think about all the minor inconveniences and discomforts that you’ve just gotten used to over the years, and remember that a paying guest might not tolerate those problems for a night. You may need to spend a little money to fix these issues.
×