Please note that some of the links below are affiliate links and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission. Know that I only recommend products, tools and learning resources I've personally used and believe are genuinely helpful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to purchase them. Most of all, I would never advocate for buying something that you can't afford or that you're not yet ready to implement.
 I started with nothing and made a decision that my highest, and first, financial priority was to acquire ownership of productive assets early in life. It was a matter of priorities. By respecting every dollar that flowed through my hands, and making a conscious, informed decision about how I wanted to put it to work, the miracle of compounding did the heavy lifting. 
Save at least 10 % of your income: Some people say that if you can’t save money, the seeds of greatness are not in you. Probably one of the best life skills is saving money, because it’s so easy to spend $100 and so hard to earn it. As calculations show, if you want to become a millionaire, you’ll have to save much more than $100 every month. Probably 30 % or more of your income for years.
Blaz Kos writes about data-driven personal development at AgileLeanLife.com. Blaz Kos helps people shape superior life strategies by: (1) employing the best business practices in personal life management, (2) teaching established psychological techniques to better manage mind and emotions, and (3) setting goals based on understanding market paradigms, the quantified self, and following cold hardcore metrics that prevent any fake feeling of progress. He is obsessively passionate about hi-tech, mass media, personal development and making the world a better place.
Saving Money is Making Money.  You may have heard the saying “You can’t “outwork a bad diet”; finances are similar. Before launching your creative new side hustle, it makes sense to sit down and look for opportunities to reduce unnecessary expenses. Now, I’m not suggesting you give up the items you and your family value and enjoy, rather let’s just trim the fat a bit.
The general population has a love/hate relationship with wealth. Some resent those who have money while simultaneously hoping for it themselves. Yet, absent some fairly specific exceptions, in a prosperous and free society, the reason a vast majority of people never accumulate a substantial nest egg is that they don't understand the nature of money or how it works. This is, in part, one of the reasons that the children and grandchildren of the wealthy have a so-called "glass floor" beneath them.
Break up with your credit card. Did you know that people who use credit cards for purchases end up spending more money than people who use cash?[6] That's because parting with cash is painful. Using a credit card doesn't carry that much of a sting. If you can, divorce your credit card and see how it feels to pay with cash. You'll probably end up saving a boatload of money.
You can find index funds through most banks (just make sure they charge less than 1% fees), or through online sites like Vanguard.com.  Pick an index fund or ETF with a long track record and set it up to automatically take $170 per month from your bank account.  Just let it sit and do not touch it for any reason!  You’re guaranteed to see the money fluctuate up and down but do not touch it!   If you just leave it alone for years and keep adding to it each month, you’re pretty likely to end up with substantial wealth.

Warren Buffett has long talked about how he focuses on creating value through two "buckets:" The earnings bucket and the investing bucket. If you are wondering how to get rich in your own life, you are likely to find that it is considerably easier to raise your net worth quickly when focusing on both of these, taking the same “double barrel” approach Buffett and his long-time business partner, Munger, have made a cornerstone of their empire.


Today, not only do we live in an exhilarating time filled with endless possibilities thanks to technology that we once considered to live in the realm of science fiction, but it's also a period that's deeply steeped in the expectancy of instant and real-time returns. The truth is that you can't get rich overnight. It takes hard work and effort. It takes persistence and massive amounts of action. It takes seeing things through and pushing past failure, even as much as you want to give up and throw in that proverbial towel.
Try Uber EATS or DoorDash. Uber EATS offers part-time work that’s similar to driving for Uber or Lyft. Instead of picking up passengers, however, you will pick up food orders and deliver them in your area. Pay works similarly, letting you earn a per-job rate plus tips. DoorDash works similarly, letting consumers order food from restaurants and connecting drivers to pick up and drop off their meals.
Earn the experience through different levels of work and when you feel like you have gained all that you can from it, consider moving on in other companies would widen your horizon on different business cultures. Putting more experiences in various positions would make you a more valuable asset for companies and making you a better option for higher rank duties.
If you’re looking for inspiration, my friend Michelle Schroeder-Gardner of the website Making Sense of Sense has become the expert on all things affiliate marketing. Michelle earns more than $100,000 per month from her blog and the bulk of her income comes from affiliate sales. Michelle has had so much success with affiliate marketing that she even has her own course called Making Sense of Affiliate Marketing.
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